Priorities

Great Care. Close to Home.

The Foundation works with healthcare leadership to identify priority projects for our community to support. Below we have highlighted some of our current projects in acute, long-term care and community. We would be pleased to provide additional information or discuss projects within specific departments or sites that are of interest to you.

As we age and grow old in the Comox Valley, we look for a standard of care that equals the comforts we are used to in our daily life. For our elderly parents, we also want the best. Through the Comox Valley Healthcare Foundation, we have the opportunity, through giving, to help create the support that we and our loved ones will need and want as we age and grow old.

Together, we have the capacity to influence change. Many of us are rounding the corner into our senior years, and if not yet, that corner is in sight. Together, we have the financial means to make a difference.

Together we can bring new medical equipment and services to our hospital. We can help seniors thrive and be re-abled after a setback from an injury or surgery. We can find new ways for people to thrive at home for as long as possible. We can enhance long-term care. We can find ways to bring joy and comfort to the elderly. We can do remarkable things for local healthcare together!

For more on how your giving can help you and your loved ones live well at every stage of life, please reach out to the Foundation office at 250-331-5957. We look forward to working with you!

Acute Care Priorities for the Hospital

$77,610

Where:
Comox Valley Hospital

Need:
The Bedside Obstetric Ultrasound is essential in providing emergency, front line care in the Maternal Child department. It is a critical tool used to determine required intervention in a timely manner and the next steps for safe patient care. Examples of use include emergency assessment to confirm breech presentation, fetal distress and determining presence of fetal heartbeat.

$53,000

Where:
Comox Valley Hospital

Need:
To support cardiac care, two Affiniti X5 probes are required. These precision instruments will significantly improve image quality and diagnostics: cardiac ultrasound images are clearer, cardiac structures are better defined, and measurements are easier to perform.  Thus helping more accurately interpret the echocardiogram and determine the best path for care. These two probes would be used every day, all day on every patient that has an echocardiogram at the hospital in the Affiniti rooms.

$35,000

Where:
Comox Valley Hospital

Need:
A Neoprobe is an essential tool for the detection of breast cancer. Neoprobe’s bluetooth probes deliver outstanding directionality and sensitivity, ensuring highly accurate localization of targeted tissue during gamma detection procedures. The Neoprobe is used for breast, melanoma, prostate, and in some cases for cervical, and head and neck cancers.

$25,000

Where:
Comox Valley Hospital

Need:
Purchasing a second hysterscope for the operating room will increase the number of procedures performed and result in faster access to diagnosis and treatment. The hysterscope is a thin, lighted, flexible tube used to examine the inside of the cervix and uterus during a hysteroscopy. During a hysteroscopy the physician can take a tissue sample (biopsy), and remove polyps, fibroids or tumors. This ability to take samples and remove small growths is essential in screening for certain cancers.

$15,000

Where:
Comox Valley Hospital

Need:
There is a growing prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders among children and youth in British Columbia. Seventy percent of mental health problems begin in childhood/adolescence, with suicide being the leading cause of death for thirteen to eighteen year olds.

By the end of 2021, almost 190 children and youth will have come to our Emergency needing care for mental health/substance use.

Our hospital has an incredibly dedicated, skilled healthcare team. This training has provided them with the ability to respond to and care for an intense variety of needs.

To ensure that emergency staff are equipped to provide the best possible care for this increasing need among our community’s youth, this fund will enable Emergency staff to take tailored training in areas such as:

Suicide Response to build understanding of how to support people who have thoughts of suicide.

Trauma Informed Practice to increase understanding of the prevalence and impact of trauma in the lives of the people requiring care.

As well as training in courses such as Addictions, Family Engagement, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, Harm Reduction, Legislation around Mental Health, and Withdrawal Management.

$10,000

Where:
Comox Valley Hospital

Need:
Code Blue is a hospital emergency code used to describe the critical status of a patient, including cardiac arrest, respiratory issues, or another advanced medical emergencies. When a Code Blue is called, a team of healthcare workers respond in a rapid, yet organized manner. Improvements in response times during cardiac arrest increase survival rates and fewer long-term complications.

According to research, it is estimated that one life would be saved for each active mock Code Blue practiced per 100 beds per year. It is essential our staff have access to the Resusci Anne torso manikin and to training to improve code blue response and outcomes for survival rate when Comox Valley residents experience in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest.

$10,000

Where:
Comox Valley Hospital

Need:
Bringing a baby into the world is emotional, exciting, and admittedly stressful for many new parents. Knowing that when they come to the Comox Valley Hospital, they are receiving top of the line care can help ease the minds of anxious parents knowing that their newborns are receiving the best possible care. Babies in the Comox Valley occasionally require stabilization prior to transport for higher levels of care if they become unwell or are at risk of becoming unwell in the first few hours or days after birth. Therefore, the Comox Valley Hospital is currently seeking funding for 16 perinatal staff to participate in ACoRN training – a program designed to teach a broad variety of skills focusing on stabilization and transport for newborns.

Long-Term Care Priorities

$150,000

Where:
The Views at St. Joseph’s

Need:
St. Joseph’s Hospital was built in the early 1900s and served as our community’s hospital for over a century. Today, the site is home to The Views at St. Joseph’s, a long-term care home owned and operated by Providence Living. The physical building reflects the standards of the day in which it was built, providing shared accommodations for as many as four people to one room.

Providence Living and its visionary leaders have taken hold of the opportunity to rebuild The Views and, together with Island Health, government, UBC, St. Paul’s Foundation (the Vancouver-based philanthropic partner of Providence Living) and Comox Valley Healthcare Foundation are bringing a groundbreaking new model for long-term care to our community. What is emerging will positively influence seniors’ care across British Columbia and beyond.

The vision embraces the concept of the home in which residents will be supported to engage in independent and meaningful lives to the full extent of their ability. They will have freedom of movement and access to nature while living in a vibrant community with amenities such as a bistro, gardens, general store and the joy of children nearby at the on-site daycare.  The care model will provide opportunities for spontaneity, community engagement and intergenerational connection.

The new building is expected to welcome its first residents in 2025 and will be home to 156 people whose accommodations will be organized into small, self-contained households of 12 private suites.

$240,000 over 4 years

Where:
The Views at St. Joseph’s

Need:
Before the rebuild of The Views is completed, a transformation will have been underway for some time within the walls of The Views at St. Joseph’s, reflecting a shift in the model of care.

This Transformation of Care project is critical in creating the knowledge and culture so that the staff are ready when the new building opens. This three year culture change program will provide training for all staff, physicians and volunteers at The Views. Taking a multiyear approach will assure that the care philosophy and practice becomes fully embedded and the culture change is sustained.

$110,000

Where:
Cumberland Lodge

Need:
Cumberland Lodge is looking to create a more inclusive dining space for all residents. Your donation will help purchase tables that can adjust to various heights so that residents in wheelchairs can enjoy a meal at the same table as friends who are seated in dining chairs. Thus allowing for more integration and the opportunity to spend time over a meal with a variety of friends. Currently, the furniture does not allow for this flexibility and restricts with whom residents can eat, if they are in a wheelchair and require a higher table setting. This furniture is comfortable, safe and built with materials that withstand frequent cleaning to maintain infection control standards.

$45,000

Where:
Cumberland Lodge

Need:
Cumberland Lodge hopes to create a sensory room for residents. Multisensory rooms draw upon a wide range of equipment: bubble tubes, projectors with images, desktop waves, fibrotic lights, aromatherapy, music and sounds, or tactile objects such as lap mats, aprons, weighted blankets, and textured items.  Known as Snoezelen, these multi-sensory items create an environment to calm and reduce agitation through the use of gentle light, soothing sound, relaxing smells and textures. They can also engage and delight the user, stimulate reactions and encourage communication. Research shows that multisensory stimulation therapy improves the quality of life and well-being for residents with cognitive impairments like dementia.

$40,000

Where:
Cumberland Lodge

Need:
Broda Chairs help residents who require significant support with sitting up and who benefit from spending more time out of bed. With the ability to sit for longer periods of time, residents are more able to participate in activities. The chair is adjustable which also gives the option of reclining to a restful position while the seat and back rest are pressure reducing to decrease the risk of pressure sores. Four chairs are currently required ($10,000 each).

$10,000

Where:
Cumberland Lodge

Need:
Some residents living at Cumberland Lodge do not have the funds to buy necessities such as razors, shampoo, socks, and clothing. Some residents have been pre-deceased by loved ones and do not have family. Holiday gatherings with visits and presents for neighbouring residents can make these times of the year even more difficult. This Fund will enable staff to ensure residents have those little necessities from a bottle of shampoo, to cozy socks and small gifts at special times of the year that ensure everyone in the home feels joy and the love of their community.

$66,500

Where:
Cumberland Lodge & Glacier View Lodge

Need:
Music Therapy, based on clinical evidence, makes use of music interventions to accomplish individualized care goals for residents. The use of music to achieve specific therapeutic goals such as managing stress; reducing anxiety; alleviating pain; enhancing memory; improving communication; expressing feelings and promoting physical rehabilitation.

Research strongly supports the power of music and movement to provide meaningful stimulation for those living with dementia. The therapeutic use of music combats loneliness, boredom and isolation, and addresses grief and feelings of abandonment.  Music Therapy provides a safe platform for people to feel connected and experience the joy and beauty of music. The overarching goal of a Music Therapist in long-term care settings is to address psychosocial and emotional wellbeing. Music Therapy focuses on residents’ strengths and is a valuable resource to engage in at end of life.

$23,000

Where:
Glacier View Lodge

Need:

The staff at Glacier View Lodge strive to create a setting where each resident thrives. They are intentional about creating moments of joy and an environment that stimulates and engages residents. For example, you may find people participating in the kinds of activities you might do at home: playing a game, gardening, listening to music, or enjoying the company of a friend.

The Lodge would like to further diversify the activities offered to residents to better match their interests by creating an outdoor workshop or club house of sorts that will allow like-minded residents to gather and work on simple projects.

Almost half of their current residents were skilled labourer who worked with their hands. Their preferred pursuits involved being outdoors, working on projects, and the socialization that comes with these activities. This shifts the type of recreational opportunities required at the Lodge to reduce loneliness, helplessness and boredom.

The benefits of the outdoor workshop are to create:

  • a gathering area that will enhance social connections with like-minded people and decrease loneliness
  • independence within a safe environment
  • unique activities to decrease boredom
  • an increased sense of purpose by working on projects that can be used within the Lodge or for fundraising
  • opportunities to sustain motor movement

We are pleased to support Glacier View Lodge’s continued effort to build a varied activities program that focuses on the unique interests and passions of their residents.

$18,500

Where:
Glacier View Lodge

Need:
Tovertafel is a games console with options designed specifically for people living with dementia. It contains a high-quality projector, infrared sensors, a loudspeaker and a processor with which interactive games are projected onto a table or floor surface.

The Tovertafel games conquer apathy, reduce restless and tense behavior, and increase positive emotions. They also promote physical activity. Many seniors, because they no longer carry out the many activities involved in daily living, need prompting and encouragement to move. The Tovertafel is a great tool to make physical activity fun!

Many people living with dementia lose the ability to remember the steps involved in completing a task and lose self-initiative, needing others to prompt their continued engagement in an activity.  The Tovertafel is largely self-prompting and responds and interacts with the person making even the smallest movement.

The Tovertafel activates players and provides cognitive, physical, social, and sensory stimulation. In later stages of dementia, residents continue to benefit from sensory stimulation. Sensory stimulation through light and sound, relaxation and reminiscence are key elements in many of the games.

Lastly, the Tovertafel provides a way for families to spend quality time together. Challenges with language and recall are common across all types of dementia, making it difficult to have a visit based on a conversation. The Tovertafel provides an experience that does not rely on skill, memory or language, much like when we visit a pretty garden, throw a ball for a dog, play a simple game with a child or grandchild, watch fireworks or a lovely sunset. The goal is not to complete a task, just to experience well-being.

Community Healthcare Priorities

$65,000

Where:
Community Healthcare Services, Island Health

Need:
Vacuum-assisted closure of a wound is a type of therapy to help wounds heal. It can be used to treat traumatic injuries or a chronic wound that is not healing properly over time, and help the wound heal more quickly. This can happen with wounds linked to diabetes, or for someone who had a recent skin graft or a large wound that can take a longer time to heal.

The gases in the air around us put pressure on the surface of our bodies. A wound vacuum device removes this pressure over the area of the wound. This can help a wound heal in several ways. It can gently pull fluid from the wound over time. This can reduce swelling, and may help clean the wound and remove bacteria. A wound vacuum also helps pull the edges of the wound together and it may stimulate the growth of new tissue that helps the wound close.

$25,000

Where:
Community Healthcare Services, Island Health

Need:
The Safe Housing Fund is a new fund for Community Healthcare Services in support of vulnerable people in our community, such as the elderly, individuals with mobility limitations, or people with mental health challenges, who require healthcare support in their homes. Creating care plans for these individuals requires a home visit by a healthcare worker and sometimes staff discover a house is no longer safe for a patient to live in. This fund will help with deep cleaning, accessibility renovations, or repairs that are necessary to re-establish a safe home for the patient so they can receive care in the comfort of their own home. This fund will also provide temporary accommodation when a patient is ready for discharge from the hospital but cannot return home because modification is in process, or because they live on one of the surrounding Islands or in another remote location and need to remain close to the hospital for out-patient care. Donations to this fund provide a huge sense of relief for patients in knowing they have help with house modifications, a temporary place to stay, and eventually the comfort of their own home. The fund also provides peace-of-mind for healthcare workers who provide at-home care and can reduce the duration of hospital stays, freeing up hospital resources.

$18,000

Where:
Mental Health & Substance Use, Island Health

Need:
This funding will facilitate a pilot project to protect vulnerable patients from dying alone as a result of toxic drug poisoning. With overdose deaths at an all time high in our community, this project involves installing Brave Sensors as a first step toward supporting patients and staff using newly available technology designed specifically to protect at-risk patients, 24 hours a day, 7 days of the week. In addition to detecting singular overdose events, any medical emergency occurring in a washroom which results in lack of motion will be detected.

The information collected from this pilot will be shared across Island Health for the potential to expand the implementation of Brave Sensors across more healthcare delivery sites.

  • Broda Chairs for the Transitional Care Unit at the Comox Valley Hospital to help patients who need significant support with sitting up, providing more opportunity to spend time out of bed with less pain.

  • Midas Rex for the Operating Room at the Comox Valley Hospital, a pneumatic drill which is a special surgical power tool used for ears, nose and throat procedures and orthopedics.

  • Blanket Warmer for Cumberland Lodge.

  • Hematology Analyzer for the Comox Valley Hospital.

  • The ENT StealthStation™ Surgical Navigation System for the Comox Valley Hospital.